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Division Leibniz Competition
Leibniz Association
Chausseestraße 111
10115 Berlin
Tel.: +49 30 / 20 60 49 - 33 or -32

Funding line 1: Quality assurance

Complementation patterns of verbs in spoken German

Institute for the German Language (IDS), Mannheim

The project studies complementation patterns of verbs in spoken German. Using large corpora, the project advocates a functional usage-based approach. A major aim of the project is to discover whether the realization of complementation patterns depends on sequential and genre-related contexts and how complementation patterns vary between speech and writing.

Period: 1. April 2012 – 31. March 2016         

Project website (in German only)
Final report (PDF)


Interplay of environmentally induced aging processes with the innate immune system

Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine (IUF)

The project investigates the interplay of environmentally induced aging processes with the innate immune system. It is well known that the immune system of aged people is impaired, which leads to enhanced susceptibility to infections. However, it is unclear if environmentally induced aging impacts the innate immune system. The skin is the largest barrier organ of the body and it protects the body from environmental clues such as UVB-irradiation. This leads to premature skin aging and induces signal pathways which resemble activation of the innate immune system. We want to analyze if UVB irradiation acts as a danger signal and contributes directly to skin aging by activation of the innate immune system. Furthermore, we want to clarify if premature skin aging alters the efficiency of the innate immune system.

Period: 1. April 2012 – 31. March 2015         
 

Project website

Final report (PDF)


Phase transition and hysteresis in the context of storage problems

Weierstrass Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics (WIAS), Berlin

The national development plan for electro mobility aims for more than 1 million electro cars in Germany until 2020.  To attain that goal new battery materials for lithium-ion batteries are developed and optimized.  To this end a firm understanding of the corresponding electro-chemical and physical processes within the battery and its mathematical description is mandatory.

In this project new mathematical models for all battery components are developed.  The models are capable to predict the voltage-charge properties of the corresponding component.  In particular, many-particle electrodes that exhibit phase transitions during the storage process are studied.  Moreover the electrolyte and its coupling to the electrodes are described by new models that remove the deficiencies of the popular Nernst-Planck and Butler-Vollmer models, respectively.

Period: 1. July 2012 – 30. June 2015             

Project website

Final report (PDF)