Website of the German Nagoya Protocol HuB goes online

The GNP HUB project sees itself as a contact point and source of support for academic researchers in Germany. The information is aimed at both newcomers and experienced researchers.

19.01.2021 · Life Sciences · Leibniz-Institute DSMZ–German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures · News · Projects

On 23 December 2020, the German Nagoya Protocol HuB (GNP HuB) project launched a new website, www.nagoyaprotocol-hub.de, which provides researchers in Germany with information on the legally compliant use of biological resources. The GNP HUB project sees itself as a contact point and source of support for academic researchers in Germany. At the same time, the GNP HuB project acts as a network for the exchange of information among researchers on the implementation of the so-called Nagoya Protocol.

Regulation (EU) No. 511/2014 of the European Parliament on measures for users to comply with the provisions of the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilisation - the Nagoya Protocol for short - entered into force in October 2014. The implementation of the Protocol in the European Union and around the world poses major challenges for researchers, which can make it difficult to carry out individual research projects with biological material from abroad. For example, researchers must obtain specific approvals for the access and use of biological materials they wish to use in their research. Each country has its own specific procedures, regulations and responsibilities, which are associated with a high level of bureaucracy.

The goal of the GNP HuB project is to help researchers better understand their obligations arising from the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol by providing useful information. "The project is more than just an information point with well-prepared and targeted information," explains project coordinator Elizabeth Karger. "We also catalyse the exchange of information among researchers in order to build a living network where experiences are shared and made useful for other researchers." The GNP HuB project website, which has now been published, is being continuously developed and offers researchers an overview of best practices in dealing with the Nagoya Protocol, possible stumbling blocks, options for dealing with challenges, and best practice examples as well as tips and tricks from the field. The information is aimed at both newcomers and experienced researchers.

The project is funded by the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation with funds from the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety. The project is managed by the Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH and is being carried out in close cooperation with the Consortium of German Natural Science Collections (DNFS), the Leibniz Research Alliance 'Biodiversity' (LVB) and the German Life Sciences Association (VBIO). "The cooperation partners come from the life sciences community, have been working intensively on questions of access and equitable benefit-sharing for many years, and have a wide range of practical experience," says Elizabeth Karger. "With this project, we can draw on the support and expertise of the research community."

Further information and contact

www.dsmz.de